LOOP Leaders In the Field Focus On Menthol, Flavors & Vaping

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unnamed (11)Dr. Valerie Yerger in Santa Clara County
Dr. Yerger was invited to present at Hooked: Reverse the Vaping Epidemic 2019 Summit in Santa Clara County on Friday, September 13th hosted by Santa Clara County Public Health Department, Tobacco Use Prevention Education, and First Five Santa Clara County. Her presentation on “Menthol, Flavors, and Vaping: Advocates Working Together to Kick These Poisons Out of Our Communities” focused on the tobacco industry’s influence in communities of color. The summit also included a keynote delivered by April Rosseler, Chief of California Tobacco Control Program with the California Department of Public Health. In addition, there was a Tobacco 101 presentation with Bonnie Helpern-Felsher, a youth experience panel, and a discussion of potential solutions with Superintendent Mary-Ann Dewan, Commissioner Leticia Pelayo, and Former Supervisor Ken Yeager.
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Carol McGruder in Fresno
Carol McGruder, Director of AMPLIFY, along with other members of the California Tobacco Control Program-funded coordinating centers (Rod Lew with the Asian American Pacific Islander Coordinating Center, Rosendo Iniguez with the Hispanic Latino Coordinating Center, Amanda Walner with LGBTQ Coordinating Center, and Wendy Kaplan with American Indian Native American Coordinating Center) held a press conference in Fresno on Tuesday, September 17th addressing the vaping epidemic. This was a timely issue as there was a vaping-related death confirmed in Tulare County.

Would you like one of the LOOP team members or trainers to present on a specific topic in your county or city? Email us at theloop@ucsf.edu.

California Rising Conference Art Gallery – Call For Entries!

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Art is a powerful tool for social change.
The California Rising: Empowering Communities to Advance Health Equity conference planning workgroup invites you to submit visual art for display during a Gallery Walk session at the conference. Creative pieces will be curated alongside data-centered poster boards depicting the story of tobacco-related disparities in California. The Gallery Walk will present visual information to reinforce the conference themes of economic inequality, tobacco industry, and traumatization, while also presenting images of action and community resilience.

FAQs

What types of visual art will be accepted?
A broad range of visual art will be considered for the Gallery Walk. Painting, drawing, photography (including Photovoice projects), sculpture, ceramics, crafts, textiles, video or recording, short written work (e.g. poetry), and others are welcome. Artifacts of culture (such as flags, clothing, accessories, and similar items) are also welcome.

The workgroup is particularly interested in pieces that showcase the tobacco industry’s targeted efforts on diverse communities; highlight data that bring tobacco-related disparities to life through visual imagery; and explore how diverse communities interpret their experience with tobacco problems and resiliency, through their unique lens. Consider perspectives that you can relate to through factors such as:

  • Race, ethnicity, culture;
  • Age,
  • Gender,
  • Sexual Orientation,
  • Socioeconomic Status,
  • Military Service Member/ Veteran Status,
  • And many more perspectives.
What are the technical requirements for submissions?
A broad and diverse range of submissions is sought; however, please note the following technical requirements
  • Accommodation cannot be made for: pieces that are greater than 24 inches in any direction (with the exception of folded textiles, for example); any piece weighing more than 25 pounds.
  • If you are submitting a digital image of your work (for example, a photo depicting tobacco’s impact on your community or a photo of your artwork in lieu of displaying the actual piece) you will be asked to provide a high resolution image, which the workgroup may choose to print on poster board for display.
  • You may submit work even if you are not attending the event, but will need to make special arrangements for drop off/pickup, and the California Tobacco Control Program (CTCP) may not be able to accommodate all arrangements. If you would like to submit work but will not be present, a digital image may be the best option.
  • If you include tobacco products of any kind in your work, they must be contained in a way that Gallery Walk participants are not exposed to toxic/unpleasant tobacco odors.
  • You may submit more than one entry.
  • The goal of the Gallery Walk is to provide a space for thoughtful reflection and candid informal discussion on tobacco related health inequities. The workgroup may decline submissions that are not aligned with the theme or intent of the Gallery Walk, or that are not logistically possible to accommodate.

    If you are unsure if your submission meets the technical requirements, or you have any questions before submitting, please contact Kara Gash at kara.gash@cdph.ca.gov.

    When and where will submissions be displayed?
    Your work will be displayed in a breakout room during the conference. The Gallery Walk room will remain locked when not attended by a CTCP staff room monitor. CTCP will be diligent in the care of submitted pieces, but is not responsible for any loss or damage that may occur.

    When is Drop off/ Pickup?
    Accepted pieces can be dropped off with CTCP staff at the registration table the evening prior to the conference or the morning of the conference. For anyone submitting work, but not attending the conference, it is the responsibility of the submitter to make arrangements for pickup/drop off with the CTCP point of contact, Kara Gash.

Have Questions or Need a Submission Form?
Contact Kara Gash at kara.gash@cdph.ca.gov.
Email your completed form and creative piece to Kara Gash.

You will be asked to upload a photo of your work, dimensions, a brief statement about your work tying it to one or more conference themes, and your contact information.

Deadline to submit: October 11, 2019

CTCP RFA “Advancing Momentum for a Tobacco-Free California” is Now Open!

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The California Department of Public Health (CDPH), California Tobacco Control Program (CTCP) has released a Request for Application (RFA) 20-10005 – Advancing Momentum for a Tobacco-Free California.

This Request for Application (RFA) will fund approximately thirty-five (35) progressive projects with three (3) or more years of demonstrated agency and staff experience in tobacco control to advance proven strategies to prevent and reduce tobacco use, strengthen partnerships with priority populations, and increase the reach and impact of tobacco control programs in underserved areas.

 

 

Need help in completing an RFA?

The LOOP has experienced Tailored Assistance Trainers who can support you in this process at NO CHARGE! Email us at TheLOOP@ucsf.edu.

 

View RFA Details Here!

Did You Know? Cigarette Use is Lower Among American Indians and Alaska Natives Living on Tribal Lands

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A recently published study examined whether cigarette use among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) is lower in metropolitan areas than in rural areas and tribal lands (which are predominantly rural).

 

Findings included:

·         Metropolitan (large or small) areas versus rural areas: no statistically significant differences in cigarette use were found.

·         Metropolitan (large or small) areas versus tribal lands: days of cigarette use and daily use were significantly lower in tribal lands.

·         Tribal lands were also lower than small metropolitan areas regarding number of cigarettes used and nicotine dependence.

·         Rural areas versus tribal lands: cigarette measures were consistently lower in tribal lands. For example, the prevalence of current smokers, daily users and nicotine dependence, respectively, was 37.9%, 25.9%, and 16.3% in rural areas and 27.4%, 13.6%, and 8.9% in tribal lands.

 

The researchers concluded that differences in cigarette use between AI/AN in nontribal rural and metropolitan areas were not indicated. Instead, the place differences found were lower cigarette use in tribal lands than in nontribal rural areas and, to some extent, metropolitan areas.

 

Source: Cunningham et al. (2019). Cigarette Use Among American Indians and Alaska Natives in Metropolitan Areas, Rural Areas, and Tribal Lands. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, Sep/Oct; 25 Suppl 5.

MEET JACK WAXMAN

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MEET JACK WAXMAN

Jack Waxman is a sophomore at Cornell University. He is the creator of Juulers Against Juul, and has appeared on Good Morning America, Good Day NY, BBC, and NPR. He worked for Senator Chuck Schumer on issues related to public health. He is currently an Ambassador for Truth Initiative, the leading tobacco control organization.

 

CHECK OUT WHAT HE IS DOING FOR THE COMMUNITY IN HIS VIDEO

“Flava In Ya Ear: Integrating Hip-Hop Culture Into Your Advocacy” Presented by The LOOP’s Godfrey Ramos

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On February 22, 2019, Godfrey Ramos of The LOOP presented for Madera County’s youth coalition, Students Working Against Tobacco (SWAT) Team. His presentation entitled, “Flava In Ya Ear: Integrating Hip-Hop Culture Into Your Advocacy”, focused on how to use the 5 Elements of Hip-Hop Culture (Emceeing, DJing, Breakdancing, Graffiti Art, and Knowledge) as a way to mobilize youth, as well the community, around tobacco control efforts.
Godfrey also presented at the 20th Annual Leaders in Life (LIL) Conference in Bakersfield on March 14, 2019. According to the LIL website, students are “educated and enlightened on issues that are important to them so that they can make healthy and informed decisions regarding drug and alcohol abuse, future career exploration, and youth advocacy; and they are motivated to help others make positive decisions.” This was Godfrey’s third consecutive year presenting at the conference.
Godfrey’s presentation has continued to gain buzz and interest because of the way it resonates with youth and young adults. He has been invited to present at the SOL Project’s 2019 SOLdiers Spring Summit in Sacramento this Saturday, April 13th!

If you would like to request assistance from Godfrey or another LOOP Tailored Assistance Trainer for your needs, contact us atTheLOOP@ucsf.edu!

Study Finds that Alaska Natives/American Indians in Contiguous US More Likely to be Smokers Compared to Other Races, but no Association Between Race and Smoking in Alaska

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Few studies have focused on understanding how sociodemographic factors impact healthy ageing in the rapidly growing population of Alaskan older adults. A newly published study compared the health of Alaskan older adults to those in the contiguous US, and determined how the associations differ between older adults in Alaska and the contiguous US.

 

Findings included:

·         In the contiguous US, females were less likely than males to be obese, while in Alaska, females were more likely to be obese.

·         In the contiguous US, Alaska Natives/American Indians were more likely than respondents of other races to be smokers, while in Alaska, the association between race and smoking was not significant.

·         These differences between Alaska and the contiguous US results suggest that programs designed to reduce disparities and promote healthy behaviours may need to be tailored to meet the unique needs and challenges of older adults living in Alaska.

 

Source: Cohen et al. (2019). Disparities in social determinants of health outcomes and behaviours between older adults in Alaska and the contiguous US: evidence from a national survey. International Journal of Circumpolar Health, Dec;78(1):1557980. doi: 10.1080/22423982.2018.1557980.

Did You Know? Tobacco Tax Policy Alone May Not Be Enough To Increase Cessation Among African Americans

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A newly published study examined the effects of cigarette price on intention to quit, quit attempts, and successful cessation among African American smokers in the U.S. and explored whether price effects differed by income level and menthol use status. Researchers analyzed cross-sectional data from 2006-2007 and 2010-2011 Tobacco Use Supplements to the Current Population Survey from 4,213 African American recent active smokers.

Findings included:

·         There was no indication that price was associated with quit attempts or successful cessation, but price was positively associated with increased odds of intending to quit among African American smokers.

·         In contrast, prices were positively associated with intention to quit and quit attempts for White smokers.

·         The association between price and intention to quit was significantly positive for African American low-income and menthol smokers but was not statistically significant for African American high-income and non-menthol smokers.

·         There was no evidence of a price effect on quit attempts and successful cessation for each subgroup of African Americans.

The researchers concluded that tobacco tax policy alone may not be enough to increase quit attempts or successful cessation among African Americans. Community-based cessation programs tailored towards African American smokers, especially low-income menthol smokers, are needed.

Source: Keeler, Max, Yerger, Yao, Wang, Ong & Sung (2018). Effects of cigarette prices on intention to quit, quit attempts, and successful cessation among African American smokers. Nicotine & Tobacco Research, Jul 18, [Epub ahead of print].

LOOP Director Dr. Valerie Yerger wins 2018 UCSF Chancellor Award for Public Service!

ValCongratulations to our own Dr. Valerie Yerger for receiving the 2018 UCSF Chancellor Award for Public Service! Each year this award honors three (3) individuals—one faculty, one staff, one student/resident/postdoctoral scholar—who demonstrate outstanding service beyond the scope of their job, area of research, or training.
A special luncheon will be held as part of the UCSF Founders Day activities on Friday, May 11, 2018, to honor Dr. Yerger and the other award recipients.
Dr. Yerger’s name will be PERMANENTLY inscribed at UCSF to recognize her commitment toward saving lives!

The LOOP Team is extremely proud of our Director, Dr. Val, on this prestigious and well-deserved honor!

Disparities Exist in Local Smoke-Free Law Coverage

“Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) from burning tobacco products causes premature death and disease in nonsmokers. Despite reductions in SHS exposure over the past 25 years, millions of US nonsmokers continue to be exposed, particularly certain population groups such as African Americans and those with lower socioeconomic status. The Surgeon General has concluded that there is no risk-free level of SHS, and that eliminating smoking in indoor areas is the only effective way to fully protect nonsmokers from exposure.” 
Excerpt from Huang J, King BA, Babb SD, Xu X, Hallett C, and Hopkins M.  Sociodemographic Disparities in Local Smoke-Free Law Coverage in 10 States. Am J Public Health. 2015;105(9):1806-1813.
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