The LOOP’s 21 Day Racial Equity Challenge Panel

Loop speaker Panel

Thursday, July 9th, 2020

10am-11:15am

Via Go To Webinar

In today’s world, change is happening all around us – at an even faster pace than we’ve seen in a long time. Change is inevitable and, often, a good thing. But change isn’t always easy. It means breaking long-standing habits that all of us have created – that includes behaviors, mindsets, and even our environments.

 

Here at The LOOP, we see health equity as part of the larger social justice solution. In our field, we must recognize bias and how various policies can negatively impact people of color, in particular. We must understand the creation and perpetuation of systemic racism before we can create solutions. Thus, borrowing from the concept created by the America & Moore consulting firm, we are challenging ourselves and our LOOP community to take part in a 21-Day Racial Equity Challenge so we can both take an introspective journey and learn more about the experiences of others.

 

As our 21 day racial equity challenge winds down, we will be bringing together a community of speakers to touch on the intersection of health and race on July 9, 2020 at 10 am. Over the course of 21 days we have asked you to engage with brief activities (read, listen, watch, etc) to explore your own biases, learn about race issues, and the impact of race on the health of our black and brown communities and how to get involved. In honor of George Floyd each speaker will have exactly 8 minutes and 46 seconds to share a statement. We hope that you are able to join us and share what you have learned in this 21 day process.

 

Speakers:

Dr. Valerie Yerger (The LOOP)

Evi Hernandez (Hispanic Latinx Coordinating Center)

Carol McGruder (AMPLIFY; AATCLC)

Rod Lew (APPEAL; SPARC)

Lou Moerner (The LOOP; American Indian/Alaska Native Advocate & Researcher)

Queen Chela (The UWC)

 

Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4566293088803086094

Have you been keeping up with the LOOP Racial Equity Challenge on Facebook?

Do you have any biases?

Have you been keeping up with the LOOP Racial Equity Challenge on Facebook?

If you missed some of the content this week, here’s a little recap:

How racial prejudices implement laws that disproportionally effect black and brown communities:

Read: Explaining White Privilege to a broke white person

 

Listen: Breakdances with Wolves 


 

Watch: Starbucks Showed This Short Film to Its Employees To Teach Them About Racial Bias | NowThis

Read: Racism in America

Listen: Intersectionality Matters

 

Be sure to follow us on Facebook and stay updated and educated on this social issue. We can all bring about change!

 

The LOOP 21 Day Racial Equity Challenge

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Why Take the Challenge?

In today’s world, change is happening all around us – at an even faster pace than we’ve seen in a long time. Change is inevitable and, often, a good thing. But change isn’t always easy. It means breaking long-standing habits that all of us have created – that includes behaviors, mindsets, and even our environments.

Here at The LOOP, we see health equity as part of the larger social justice solution. In our field, we must recognize bias and how various policies can negatively impact people of color, in particular. We must understand the creation and perpetuation of systemic racism before we can create solutions. Thus, borrowing from the concept created by the America & Moore consulting firm, we are challenging ourselves and our LOOP community to take part in a 21-Day Racial Equity Challenge so we can both take an introspective journey and learn more about the experiences of others.

Starting TODAY, Juneteenth (June 19th), visit our LOOP Facebook page and consider participating in the “Watch,” “Listen,” “Read,” “Notice” or other tasks that will be posted daily. We will close out the challenge on July 9th with an online speaker series featuring a group of experts who will each speak for 8 minutes and 46 seconds exactly in honor of George Floyd.

We hope you’ll take this journey with us!

Follow Us on Facebook to Join the Challenge

 

LOOP 21 Day Challenge Graphic Calendar

Some Community Updates You Should Know About

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Paid Media Planning Webinar Series

As previously announced, the California Tobacco Control Program’s (CTCP) regional in-person Paid Media Planning Trainings have been canceled. In their place, CTCP’s Media Unit is hosting a two-part series of webinar trainings. The webinars will feature much of the same content as the trainings and build on the 2018 Paid Media Technical Assistance Sessions and Communications Plan Trainings to offer attendees a deeper look into best practices of paid media. All CTCP-funded partners are invited to attend. Please see below for dates and times:
Paid Media Planning: Aligning Media and Campaign Efforts Webinar | Tuesday, July, 14 from 10:00-11:30 am
Topics will include aligning paid media to best support project objectives and building communications plans.
Paid Media Planning: Paid Social and Digital Media Webinar | Tuesday, July 21 from 10:00-11:30 am
Topics will include digital tactics to consider at the local level and paid social media.
For details and to register, please visit: http://www.cvent.com/d/hnq6h8.

For more information, please contact Amelia Anderson, 916-449-5470

 

webinar picWebinar: New Way To Submit TA Requests and Refresher On Tobacco Education Clearinghouse Of California (TECC) Services

Starting June 1, 2020 TECC will implement a new way to submit technical assistance (TA) requests!
Please join us on this webinar: TECC Support 101: Technical Assistance for Educational Material Development on Wednesday, June 3, 2020 from 2:00PM – 3:00 PM to learn about how to submit TA requests in MatTrack and the services we provide for your educational material needs. This webinar is great for new and existing projects.

For more information, please contact Claudia Medina, (916) 883-0116

 

nicotine patchOver 1500 Free Nicotine Patches Mailed To Eligible Smokers Who Called The Helpline

The California Smokers’ Helpline sent out 1,500 two-week nicotine patch starter kits to eligible smokers over the past month. Thank you for continuing to promote the Helpline and this offer in your community. Let’s keep the momentum going to help people quit!
Cigarette smokers over 18-years-old who call 1-800-NO-BUTTS (1-800-662-8887) can receive a free, two-week starter kit of nicotine patches mailed to their home, while supplies last. The nicotine patches are made possible through a Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program grant.
CA Quits collaborated with several Statewide Coordinating Centers to develop flyers tailored to different populations. Download the flyers here: https://cdn2.hubspot.net/hubfs/131650/CSH-NRT-Starter-Flyer.pdf

For more information, please contact Lesley Phillips, (858) 3001051

Tobacco Stores and Vapes Shops are Non-Essential Businesses

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Tobacco Stores and Vapes Shops are Non-Essential Businesses

On March 19, 2020, Governor Gavin Newsom issued Executive Order N-33-20directing all California residents to stay at home unless they are designated as an “essential critical infrastructure worker,” along with an Essential Workforce documentoutlining which types of workers and businesses may remain open to the public during this time. Despite not being listed as an essential workplace on this document, many tobacco stores and vape shops around the state have remained open and continued to sell tobacco products. This has led to unequal enforcement of the Executive Order across the state. This Frequently Asked Questions document has been prepared to answer questions from businesses, local health departments, and local law enforcement agencies as to why tobacco stores and vape shops do not meet the criteria as essential businesses, and, therefore, should not remain open.

Did You Know: Anxiety Sensitivity Mediates the Relations between Acculturative Stress and Smoking among Latinx Smokers

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Although acculturative stress is a known individual difference factor related to poor health, little is understood about its relationship to smoking among Latinx adults. A recently published study examined whether anxiety sensitivity mediated the relations between acculturative stress and smoking among a large sample of adult Spanish-speaking Latinx smokers. Data from 359 Spanish-speaking Latinx daily smokers were analyzed. There were statistically significant indirect effects of acculturative stress via anxiety sensitivity in relation to cigarette dependence, perceived barriers for quitting cigarettes, and severity of problems during past quit attempts. The researchers concluded that anxiety sensitivity serves a mediational role in relations between acculturative stress and smoking outcomes among Latinx adult smokers.
Source: Zvolensky et al. (2020). Acculturative Stress, Anxiety Sensitivity, and Smoking among Spanish-Speaking Latinx Adult Smokers. Substance Use & Misuse, Mar 5:1-11. doi: 10.1080/10826084.2020.1729195. [Epub ahead of print]

Did You Know: African Americans in Multiunit Housing are Exposed to Higher Levels of Thirdhand Smoke

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Secondhand smoke (SHS) is a common indoor pollutant in multiunit housing (MUH). It is also the precursor of thirdhand smoke (THS), the toxic mixture of tobacco smoke residue that accumulates in indoor environments where tobacco has been used. A newly published study examined the levels, distribution, and factors associated with THS pollution in low-income MUH. Interviews were conducted 2016-2018 in a cross-sectional study of N=220 MUH homes in San Diego, California.

Findings included:

  • Nicotine was detected in all homes of nonsmokers with indoor smoking bans and smokers regardless of an indoor ban.
  • Approximately 10% of nonsmokers’ homes with smoking bans showed nicotine levels higher than the average level in homes of smokers without smoking bans from previous studies.
  • Housing for seniors, smoking bans on balconies, indoor tobacco use, difficult to reach surfaces, and self-reported African-American race/ethnicity were independently associated with higher THS levels.
  • Individual cases demonstrated that high levels of surface nicotine may persist in nonsmoker homes for years after tobacco use even in the presence of indoor smoking bans.

The researchers recommend that to achieve MUH free of tobacco smoke pollutants, attention must be given to identifying and remediating highly polluted units to implementing smoking policies that prevent new accumulation of THS.

Source: Matt et al. (2020). Persistent Tobacco Smoke Residue in Multiunit Housing: Legacy of Permissive Indoor Smoking Policies and Challenges in the Implementation of Smoking Bans. Preventive Medicine Reports, April (in press)

Did You Know: Less Than Half of Teachers and Parents Know What a JUUL Looks Like

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Electronic cigarette use, including JUUL, has risen to epidemic levels among high school and middle school students in the United States. Schools serve as a key environment for prevention and intervention efforts to address e-cigarette use, yet little is known about the awareness of and response to e-cigarettes in schools. A newly published study of middle and high school teachers and administrators (n = 1,420) measured JUUL awareness, e-cigarette policies, and barriers to enforcement in schools.

 

Findings included:

  • While two thirds of respondents had heard of a product called JUUL (68%), less than half accurately identified a photo of a JUUL as a vaping device/e-cigarette (47%).
  • Awareness of JUUL (81%) was higher among high school teachers (83%) than among middle school teachers (78%).
  • A large majority of respondents reported that their school had an e-cigarette policy (83%), but less than half of the sample worked in a school with a policy that specifically included JUUL (43%).
  • Those working in a school with an e-cigarette policy in place noted that e-cigarettes’ discreet appearance (66%) and difficulties in identifying origin of vapor or scent (46%) made the policy difficult to enforce.

 

The researchers concluded that efforts to increase middle and high school staff awareness of the ever-evolving e-cigarette market are essential to help prevent youth use.

 

Source: Schillo et al. (2019). JUUL in School: Teacher and Administrator Awareness and Policies of E-Cigarettes and JUUL in U.S. Middle and High Schools. Health Promotion Practice, Sept 18. [Epub ahead of print]

 

Upcoming Webinars You Should Know!

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Spanish Policy Webinar May 12th: Pólizas Y Políticas En Su Comunidad

Pólizas y Políticas en Su Comunidad: Como Involucrase y Reducir el Consumo de Tabaco 

El Centro de Coordinación de Leyes y Pólizas y el Centro de Coordinación para Hispanos y Latinos los invita a participar en nuestro seminario virtual de “Pólizas y Políticas en Su Comunidad”.  Nuestros expertos explicarán los niveles de gobierno de los Estados Unidos, el proceso para formar pólizas al nivel local, y cómo crear soluciones locales que promueven la salud en su comunidad. Los participantes también aprenderán cómo su voz es necesaria para crear soluciones y pólizas locales que controlan y reducen el uso de tabaco en comunidades Latinas. El objetivo de este seminario es desarrollar capacidades y empoderar a los miembros de la comunidad para que se involucren en las actividades de su gobierno local, especialmente para crear comunidades saludables. Este seminario virtual será 100% en español.

12 de Mayo del 2020
10:00am a 11:30am
Registración: https://mitchellhamline.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ZJJwnZJPTkSxwMg_i9gfXg

Policy and Politics in Your Community: Community Engagement and Reducing Tobacco Use

Join the Law and Policy Coordinating Center and the Hispanic/Latino Coordinating Center on the “Pólizas y Políticas en Su Comunidad” webinar. This webinar will be 100% in Spanish. Experts will explain the U.S. levels of governments in the local policy making process, and how to address local issues like tobacco use. Participants will also learn how their voice is necessary in the policy making process to help reduce tobacco related disparities in the Latino community. The goal of this webinar is to build capacity and empower community members to get involved in their local government, especially to promote healthy communities.

The target audience for this webinar is Spanish speaking community members but it is also highly encouraged for bilingual advocates who wish to see an example on how to explain local policy in Spanish.
For more information, please contact Karina Camacho, (916) 585-7669

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Webinar: Tribal Policy Repository Lessons Learned And Next Steps

Califonia’s Clean Air Project (CCAP)

Please join CCAP for the Tribal Policy Repository Lessons Learned and Next Steps  webinar on Thursday, May 14, 2020  from 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM. This webinar will highlight CCAP’s work in the adoption and implementation of smoke-free policies within tribal lands. Participants will learn about the variations in tribal policy documentation and be able to determine best practices when working with tribes regarding SHS policies.

Register here: https://join-etr.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_kZpAfuUCRkS78gVzXYJ7Nw

 

For more information, please contact Manveer Sahota, (831) 440-2114 Ext 115

New Racial Data Released in California on COVID Infections

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The San Francisco Chronicle published an article on April 9, 2020 that included the following information:
  • Of the 6,306 Californians with the coronavirus for whom demographic information was made available, 37% are white (whites make up 37% of the state’s population); 30% are Latino (Latinos make up 39% of the state’s population); 14% are Asian or Asian American (Asians/Asian Americans make up 15% of the state’s population) and 6% are black (African Americans make up 6% of state’s population). The demographic breakdowns were similar for 172 people who have died and for whom information was released.
  • San Francisco provided demographic data on Tuesday for about two-thirds of 676 cases; the rates of infection closely matched the racial and ethnic breakdowns of the city.
  • Meanwhile, no other Bay Area counties — including Alameda County, which has a large African American population — have provided demographic data.
To read the full article (subscription required), CLICK HERE.
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