Did You Know? Study Shows that Tobacco 21 Policies are Effective in Reducing Smoking Among 18-20 Year Olds

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States and municipalities are increasingly restricting tobacco sales to those under age-21, in an effort to reduce youth and young adult smoking. A recently published study examined the effectiveness of such policies. Researchers analyzed 2011 – 2016 data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System’s Selected Metropolitan/Micropolitan Area Risk Trends dataset.

 

Findings included:

·         Current smoking rates fell from 16.5 percent in 2011 to 8.9 percent in 2016 among 18-20 year-olds in these data.

·         A tobacco-21 policy covering one’s entire metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas (MMSA) yields an approximately 3.1 percentage point reduction in 18 to 20 year-olds’ likelihoods of smoking.

·         Accounting for partial policy exposure – tobacco-21 laws implemented in some but not all jurisdictions within an MMSA implies that the average exposed 18 to 20 year-old experienced a 1.2 percentage point drop in their likelihood of being a smoker.

 

The researchers concluded that local tobacco-21 policies yield a substantive reduction in smoking among 18 to 20 year-olds living in metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas. This finding provides empirical support for efforts to raise the tobacco purchasing age to 21 as a means to reduce young adult smoking. Moreover, it suggests that state laws preempting local tobacco-21 policies may impede public health.

 

Source: Friedman & Wu (2019). Do Local Tobacco-21 Laws Reduce Smoking among 18 to 20 Year-Olds? Nicotine & Tobacco Research, Jul 26. pii: ntz123. doi: 10.1093/ntr/ntz123. [Epub ahead of print]

Using the Internet to Reach Smokers who are Homeless

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The prevalence of cigarette smoking among people experiencing homelessness is 70%. A recently published study examined exposure to tobacco messaging among homeless smokers.  The researchers recruited a sample of adults experiencing homelessness who were current cigarette smokers (i.e. smoked in the past 30 days) from shelters and service sites in San Francisco. The survey explored self-reported use of internet and online streaming services, and exposure to tobacco messaging.

 

Findings included:

  • 75% of respondents reported using the internet and 67% reported using online streaming video in a typical week.
  • Many participants had seen online advertisements for tobacco products (42%) or anti-tobacco industry messages (46%), although participants reported seeing both advertisements and warnings related to tobacco more frequently offline than online.
  • Respondents who reported using the internet for more than 4 h in a typical week were more likely to recall seeing tobacco-related warnings or advertisements online.
  • Respondents who reported seeing tobacco-related warnings and advertisements were more likely to have attempted to quit smoking within the past year.

 

The researchers concluded that these findings suggest an opportunity to use the internet to communicate the harms of tobacco products with messages tailored towards adults experiencing homelessness.

Source: Elser et al. (2019). Exposure to pro- and anti-tobacco messages online and off-line among people experiencing homelessness. Preventive Medicine Report, Jul 3, 15, 100944.

Did You Know? Low Income Linked to E-Cigarette Use

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A recently published study examined associations between sociodemographic factors and e-cigarette use in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) for years 2015-2016 were analyzed to assess e-cigarette use.

 

Findings included:

  • Compared with adults aged ≥55 years, odds of e-cigarette use were 4.77 times higher among ages 18 to 34 years and 2.16 times higher among ages 35 to 54 years.
  • Higher odds of e-cigarette use were observed among widowed/divorced/separated participants compared with those who were married/living with a partner, among participants with less than high school or high school/general educational development (GED) education compared with those with college degrees/some college, and among those with incomes below the poverty level compared with above the poverty level.
  • For non-smokers of conventional cigarettes, higher odds of e-cigarette use were observed among males compared with females, Mexican Americans/Other Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic whites, and non-working participants compared with those who were working.

 

Overall findings indicate that individuals who are widowed/divorced/separated, individuals with lower education, and with incomes below the poverty level are more likely to report ever use of e-cigarettes.

Source: Stallings-Smith & Ballantyne (2019). Ever Use of E-Cigarettes Among Adults in the United States: A Cross-Sectional Study of Sociodemographic Factors. Inquiry, Jan-Dec, 56:46958019864479.

California Rising Conference Art Gallery – Call For Entries!

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Art is a powerful tool for social change.
The California Rising: Empowering Communities to Advance Health Equity conference planning workgroup invites you to submit visual art for display during a Gallery Walk session at the conference. Creative pieces will be curated alongside data-centered poster boards depicting the story of tobacco-related disparities in California. The Gallery Walk will present visual information to reinforce the conference themes of economic inequality, tobacco industry, and traumatization, while also presenting images of action and community resilience.

FAQs

What types of visual art will be accepted?
A broad range of visual art will be considered for the Gallery Walk. Painting, drawing, photography (including Photovoice projects), sculpture, ceramics, crafts, textiles, video or recording, short written work (e.g. poetry), and others are welcome. Artifacts of culture (such as flags, clothing, accessories, and similar items) are also welcome.

The workgroup is particularly interested in pieces that showcase the tobacco industry’s targeted efforts on diverse communities; highlight data that bring tobacco-related disparities to life through visual imagery; and explore how diverse communities interpret their experience with tobacco problems and resiliency, through their unique lens. Consider perspectives that you can relate to through factors such as:

  • Race, ethnicity, culture;
  • Age,
  • Gender,
  • Sexual Orientation,
  • Socioeconomic Status,
  • Military Service Member/ Veteran Status,
  • And many more perspectives.
What are the technical requirements for submissions?
A broad and diverse range of submissions is sought; however, please note the following technical requirements
  • Accommodation cannot be made for: pieces that are greater than 24 inches in any direction (with the exception of folded textiles, for example); any piece weighing more than 25 pounds.
  • If you are submitting a digital image of your work (for example, a photo depicting tobacco’s impact on your community or a photo of your artwork in lieu of displaying the actual piece) you will be asked to provide a high resolution image, which the workgroup may choose to print on poster board for display.
  • You may submit work even if you are not attending the event, but will need to make special arrangements for drop off/pickup, and the California Tobacco Control Program (CTCP) may not be able to accommodate all arrangements. If you would like to submit work but will not be present, a digital image may be the best option.
  • If you include tobacco products of any kind in your work, they must be contained in a way that Gallery Walk participants are not exposed to toxic/unpleasant tobacco odors.
  • You may submit more than one entry.
  • The goal of the Gallery Walk is to provide a space for thoughtful reflection and candid informal discussion on tobacco related health inequities. The workgroup may decline submissions that are not aligned with the theme or intent of the Gallery Walk, or that are not logistically possible to accommodate.

    If you are unsure if your submission meets the technical requirements, or you have any questions before submitting, please contact Kara Gash at kara.gash@cdph.ca.gov.

    When and where will submissions be displayed?
    Your work will be displayed in a breakout room during the conference. The Gallery Walk room will remain locked when not attended by a CTCP staff room monitor. CTCP will be diligent in the care of submitted pieces, but is not responsible for any loss or damage that may occur.

    When is Drop off/ Pickup?
    Accepted pieces can be dropped off with CTCP staff at the registration table the evening prior to the conference or the morning of the conference. For anyone submitting work, but not attending the conference, it is the responsibility of the submitter to make arrangements for pickup/drop off with the CTCP point of contact, Kara Gash.

Have Questions or Need a Submission Form?
Contact Kara Gash at kara.gash@cdph.ca.gov.
Email your completed form and creative piece to Kara Gash.

You will be asked to upload a photo of your work, dimensions, a brief statement about your work tying it to one or more conference themes, and your contact information.

Deadline to submit: October 11, 2019

Did You Know? Cigarette Use is Lower Among American Indians and Alaska Natives Living on Tribal Lands

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A recently published study examined whether cigarette use among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) is lower in metropolitan areas than in rural areas and tribal lands (which are predominantly rural).

 

Findings included:

·         Metropolitan (large or small) areas versus rural areas: no statistically significant differences in cigarette use were found.

·         Metropolitan (large or small) areas versus tribal lands: days of cigarette use and daily use were significantly lower in tribal lands.

·         Tribal lands were also lower than small metropolitan areas regarding number of cigarettes used and nicotine dependence.

·         Rural areas versus tribal lands: cigarette measures were consistently lower in tribal lands. For example, the prevalence of current smokers, daily users and nicotine dependence, respectively, was 37.9%, 25.9%, and 16.3% in rural areas and 27.4%, 13.6%, and 8.9% in tribal lands.

 

The researchers concluded that differences in cigarette use between AI/AN in nontribal rural and metropolitan areas were not indicated. Instead, the place differences found were lower cigarette use in tribal lands than in nontribal rural areas and, to some extent, metropolitan areas.

 

Source: Cunningham et al. (2019). Cigarette Use Among American Indians and Alaska Natives in Metropolitan Areas, Rural Areas, and Tribal Lands. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, Sep/Oct; 25 Suppl 5.

Did You Know? Cigarette Use Patterns Over Time Differ for White and Hispanic White Youth

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A newly published study examined whether adolescent cigarette and e-cigarette use patterns over time differ by ethnicity. Data were pooled from three cohort studies of adolescents in California and Connecticut.

 

Findings included:

·         Among non-Hispanic White (NHW) participants, ever e-cigarette or cigarette users at baseline (vs. never users) had significantly higher odds of past 30-day use tobacco use pattern at follow-up.

·         Among Hispanic White (HW) participants, compared with never users, exclusive e-cigarette users at baseline had increased odds of continued e-cigarette use but not of transition to exclusive cigarette use at follow-up and HW exclusive cigarette users at baseline had greater odds of continued cigarette use but not of transition to exclusive e-cigarette use at follow-up.

 

Findings that NHW youth report more transitional use patterns and HW youth report more stable use patterns suggest a potential for differential impacts of e-cigarettes, by ethnicity, in increasing subsequent transition to or cessation from cigarette smoking.

 

Source: Barrington-Trimis et al. (2019). Ethnic Differences in Patterns of Cigarette and E-Cigarette Use Over Time Among Adolescents. The Journal of Adolescent Health, Jun 24. pii: S1054-139X(19)30199-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2019.04.002. [Epub ahead of print]

56% of Adolescent Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems Users Also Use Other Tobacco Products

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A newly published study examined how adolescents use electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), and compared youth who are only use ENDS and polytobacco users (ENDS and at least one other tobacco product). Researchers surveyed a nationally representative sample of 3,517 13-25-year olds.

Findings included:

·         4.5% of adolescents and 10% of young adults reported past 30-day ENDS use.

·         ENDS users were 38.8% female and 70.6% white.

·         Over half (55.9%) were polytobacco ENDS users.

·         The most common patterns of polytobacco ENDS use were ENDS and cigarettes (11.5%), ENDS and cigars (7.7%), and ENDS, cigars, and waterpipe (5.2%).

·         Those who perceived ENDS to be less harmful than cigarettes were more likely to be exclusive ENDS users than those who perceived ENDS to be as or more harmful than cigarettes.

·         There were no differences between ENDS groups on age, race, sex, parental education, sexual orientation, or ENDS use frequency.

The researchers concluded that the Food and Drug Administration is responsible for communicating product risk to consumers and should consider common patterns of use and relative risk perceptions in its ENDS public education efforts.

Source: King et al. (2018). Polytobacco Use Among a Nationally Representative Sample of Adolescent and Young Adult E-Cigarette Users. The Journal of Adolescent Health, Aug 13. pii: S1054-139X(18)30186-1. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2018.04.010. [Epub ahead of print]

Did You Know? Sexual Minority Youth at Greater Risk of Alcohol, Tobacco and Marijuana Use

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A recently published study examined substance use disparities among sexual minority youth. The current subsample of 348,175 students participated in the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) study from years 2005 to 2015.

 

Findings included:

·         Female lesbian and bisexual youth were at risk of initiating substance use at younger ages and, among lifetime users, were more likely to persist in their tobacco and marijuana use over time, relative to sexually active female heterosexual youth.

·         Among lifetime users, male youth with partners of both sexes were at greater risk of persistent use of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana over time and earlier ages of first use.

 

Source: Talley et al. (2019). Sexual Minority Youth at Risk of Early and Persistent Alcohol, Tobacco, and Marijuana Use. Archives of Sexual Behavior, Jan 2. doi: 10.1007/s10508-018-1275-7. [Epub ahead of print]

 

Missed the JUUL Hearings? Watch the Videos Below! Plus, LOOP Leaders Attended the Hearings

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JUUL Called Before Congressional Subcommittee

On July 24 and 25, 2019, the Subcommittee on Economic and Consumer Policy, led by Chairman Raja Krishnamoorthi, held hearings to examine JUUL Labs, Inc.’s responsibility for the youth nicotine addiction epidemic.

 

Watch Part I and II of the hearings below:

Part I of the Congressional Hearings

 

Part II of the Congressional Hearings

 

Our LOOP Leaders Attended these Hearings!

Check out our very own Dr. Valerie Yerger and Carol McGruder who were present at the hearings. In fact, they were sitting in the very front row behind the JUUL co-founder. They were featured in the New York Times article photo (below).

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