Did You Know? Rural Residents Less Supportive Of Secondhand Smoke Restrictions

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A newly published study compared support for secondhand smoke (SHS) restrictions across rural and urban areas. Smoking inside the home was assessed along with attitudes toward smoking in bars, casinos, playgrounds, cars, and cars with kids.

Findings included:

·         Urban respondents were significantly more supportive of all SHS policies: (e.g. smoking in bars [57.9% vs. 51.4%]; support for kids in cars [94.8% vs. 92.5%].

·         Greatest difference between urban-rural residents was in Mid-Atlantic (bar restrictions) and Southeast (home bans): almost 10% less supportive.

·         Rural residents were least likely to support SHS in homes, in cars, on playgrounds and in bars.

·         South Central rural residents were significantly less likely to support SHS policies-home bans, smoking in cars with kids, on playgrounds, in bars and casinos; while Heartland rural residents were significantly more supportive of policies restricting smoking in cars, cars with kids and on playgrounds.

Source: Stillman et al. (2018). Variations in support for secondhand smoke restrictions across diverse rural regions of the United States. Preventive Medicine, Sep 24;116:157-165. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.09.014. [Epub ahead of print]

Read the paper at: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0091743518302925?via%3Dihub

Did You Know? Urban Residents Are More Likely To Self-Impose Indoor Household Tobacco Restrictions

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A newly published study examined factors related to self-imposed indoor household tobacco restrictions, with emphasis on children in the household and associations with combustible and noncombustible product use. Researchers analyzed data from a cross-sectional survey of urban and rural Ohio adult tobacco users classified participants as exclusive combustible users, smokeless tobacco (SLT) users, e-cigarette users, or dual users.

 Findings included:

  • 1210 tobacco users participated, including 25.7% with children living in the home. Half allowed combustible and two thirds allowed noncombustible tobacco use indoors.
  • Urban location, younger age, male sex, college education, household income of more than $15,000, and being married were associated with a higher likelihood of banning combustible products indoors.
  • SLT and e-cigarette users were more likely to have indoor bans compared to combustible users.
  • Children in the household, older age, and nonwhite race were associated with a higher likelihood of banning noncombustible products indoors.
  • Combustible and e-cigarette users were more likely than SLT users to have indoor bans.

 

The researchers concluded that indoor restrictions on tobacco use remain infrequent in homes with children and are associated with user type and socioeconomic factors. Recommendations included targeting modifiable risk factors for in-home secondhand smoke exposure through public policy.

Source: Kopp et al. (2018). Impact of Presence of Children on Indoor Tobacco Restrictions in Households of Urban and Rural Adult Tobacco Users. Academic Pediatrics, Apr 10. pii: S1876-2859(18)30165-7. doi: 10.1016/j.acap.2018.04.002. [Epub ahead of print]

Did You Know? Study Highlights Smoking Patterns Among Adults Receiving Housing Assistance

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A recently published study examined patterns of cigarette smoking (current, former, never) by sociodemographic, household, and chronic disease characteristics and correlates among US adults receiving housing assistance from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) during 2007-2012. 

Findings included:

  • Overall, 48% of HUD-assisted adults were never smokers, 33% were current smokers, and 19% were former smokers.
  • The percentage of never smokers was significantly higher among adults aged 18 to 44 (54%) or 65 years or older (50%) than among adults aged 45 to 64 (38%).
  • The percentage of never smokers was significantly higher among women (51%) than men (41%).
  • The percentage of never smokers was significantly higher among Hispanic adults (59%) and non-Hispanic black adults (55%) than non-Hispanic white adults (37%)

 

Source: Wang et al. (2018). Characteristics and Correlates of Cigarette Smoking Status Among US Adults Receiving Federal Housing Assistance. Preventing Chronic Disease, Mar 22;15:E48. doi: 10.5888/pcd15.170395.

 

Did You Know? African American And Low SES Children With Asthma Have More Exposure To Passive Tobacco Smoke

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A newly published study examined the risk of asthma in children exposed to passive tobacco smoke. Researchers analyzed National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data collected from 2003 to 2014 (n = 8064).

Findings included:

  • The proportion of children living with household smokers decreased from 24.9% in the 2003-2004 cycle to 11.4% in the 2013-2014 cycle.
  • Highly exposed asthmatic children were primarily Non-Hispanic Black and whose family incomes were below poverty guidelines.
  • Overall results reveal passive smoke exposure level among children ages 3-11 in the US decreased over the study period.
  • Nevertheless, higher exposure to passive smoke is still associated with higher odds of childhood asthma.

 The researchers concluded that targeted smoking cessation interventions in clinical practices are needed to reduce tobacco smoke exposure and related asthma risk in children, particularly in low-income and minority groups.

 

Source: Zhang et al. (2018). Decreasing trend in passive tobacco smoke exposure and association with asthma in U.S. children. Environmental Research, May 31;166:35-41. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2018.05.022. [Epub ahead of print]

Did You Know That Smoke-Free Policies Can Be Effective in Permanent Supportive Housing?

 Smoke-free policies effectively reduce secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure among non-smokers, reduce consumption, encourage quit attempts, and minimize relapse to smoking among smokers. However, such policies are uncommon in permanent supportive housing (PSH) for formerly homeless individuals. A recently published study, involving a collaboration with a PSH provider in San Diego, California, assessed a smoke-free policy that restricted indoor smoking. Between August and November 2015, residents completed a pre-policy questionnaire on attitudes toward smoke-free policies and exposure to secondhand smoke, and then 7-9 months after policy implementation residents were re-surveyed.

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