Alternative Tobacco Product Use, Ownership of Tobacco Promotional Items, and Easy Access to Cigarettes Linked to Increased Smoking Susceptibility Among Youth

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A newly published study examined perceptions and behaviors associated with smoking susceptibility among adolescents in the current tobacco landscape. Participants were 8th and 10th grade never-smokers of conventional cigarettes from Monitoring the Future surveys (2014-2016).

 

Findings included:

  • Among never-smokers of conventional cigarettes, 17% were susceptible to smoking, 6% were past 30-day alternative tobacco product users, and 4% owned tobacco promotional items.
  • Alternative tobacco product use, ownership of tobacco promotional items, and easy access to cigarettes were associated with increased likelihood of smoking susceptibility.
  • Perceived great influence by antismoking ads and higher perceived addictiveness of conventional cigarette smoking were associated with lower odds of smoking susceptibility.

 

The researchers concluded that alternative tobacco product use, ownership of tobacco promotional items, easy access to cigarettes, low influence by antismoking ads, and low perceptions of the addictiveness of conventional cigarettes are significant and actionable risk factors for smoking susceptibility among adolescents.

Source: Owotomo & Maslowsky (2018). Adolescent Smoking Susceptibility in the Current Tobacco Context: 2014-2016. American Journal of Health Behavior, May 1;42(3):102-113. doi: 10.5993/AJHB.42.3.10.

Did You Know? Study Shows that Tobacco 21 Policies are Effective in Reducing Smoking Among 18-20 Year Olds

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States and municipalities are increasingly restricting tobacco sales to those under age-21, in an effort to reduce youth and young adult smoking. A recently published study examined the effectiveness of such policies. Researchers analyzed 2011 – 2016 data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System’s Selected Metropolitan/Micropolitan Area Risk Trends dataset.

 

Findings included:

·         Current smoking rates fell from 16.5 percent in 2011 to 8.9 percent in 2016 among 18-20 year-olds in these data.

·         A tobacco-21 policy covering one’s entire metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas (MMSA) yields an approximately 3.1 percentage point reduction in 18 to 20 year-olds’ likelihoods of smoking.

·         Accounting for partial policy exposure – tobacco-21 laws implemented in some but not all jurisdictions within an MMSA implies that the average exposed 18 to 20 year-old experienced a 1.2 percentage point drop in their likelihood of being a smoker.

 

The researchers concluded that local tobacco-21 policies yield a substantive reduction in smoking among 18 to 20 year-olds living in metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas. This finding provides empirical support for efforts to raise the tobacco purchasing age to 21 as a means to reduce young adult smoking. Moreover, it suggests that state laws preempting local tobacco-21 policies may impede public health.

 

Source: Friedman & Wu (2019). Do Local Tobacco-21 Laws Reduce Smoking among 18 to 20 Year-Olds? Nicotine & Tobacco Research, Jul 26. pii: ntz123. doi: 10.1093/ntr/ntz123. [Epub ahead of print]

LOOP Leaders In the Field Focus On Menthol, Flavors & Vaping

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unnamed (11)Dr. Valerie Yerger in Santa Clara County
Dr. Yerger was invited to present at Hooked: Reverse the Vaping Epidemic 2019 Summit in Santa Clara County on Friday, September 13th hosted by Santa Clara County Public Health Department, Tobacco Use Prevention Education, and First Five Santa Clara County. Her presentation on “Menthol, Flavors, and Vaping: Advocates Working Together to Kick These Poisons Out of Our Communities” focused on the tobacco industry’s influence in communities of color. The summit also included a keynote delivered by April Rosseler, Chief of California Tobacco Control Program with the California Department of Public Health. In addition, there was a Tobacco 101 presentation with Bonnie Helpern-Felsher, a youth experience panel, and a discussion of potential solutions with Superintendent Mary-Ann Dewan, Commissioner Leticia Pelayo, and Former Supervisor Ken Yeager.
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Carol McGruder in Fresno
Carol McGruder, Director of AMPLIFY, along with other members of the California Tobacco Control Program-funded coordinating centers (Rod Lew with the Asian American Pacific Islander Coordinating Center, Rosendo Iniguez with the Hispanic Latino Coordinating Center, Amanda Walner with LGBTQ Coordinating Center, and Wendy Kaplan with American Indian Native American Coordinating Center) held a press conference in Fresno on Tuesday, September 17th addressing the vaping epidemic. This was a timely issue as there was a vaping-related death confirmed in Tulare County.

Would you like one of the LOOP team members or trainers to present on a specific topic in your county or city? Email us at theloop@ucsf.edu.

Did You Know? Cigarette Use Patterns Over Time Differ for White and Hispanic White Youth

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A newly published study examined whether adolescent cigarette and e-cigarette use patterns over time differ by ethnicity. Data were pooled from three cohort studies of adolescents in California and Connecticut.

 

Findings included:

·         Among non-Hispanic White (NHW) participants, ever e-cigarette or cigarette users at baseline (vs. never users) had significantly higher odds of past 30-day use tobacco use pattern at follow-up.

·         Among Hispanic White (HW) participants, compared with never users, exclusive e-cigarette users at baseline had increased odds of continued e-cigarette use but not of transition to exclusive cigarette use at follow-up and HW exclusive cigarette users at baseline had greater odds of continued cigarette use but not of transition to exclusive e-cigarette use at follow-up.

 

Findings that NHW youth report more transitional use patterns and HW youth report more stable use patterns suggest a potential for differential impacts of e-cigarettes, by ethnicity, in increasing subsequent transition to or cessation from cigarette smoking.

 

Source: Barrington-Trimis et al. (2019). Ethnic Differences in Patterns of Cigarette and E-Cigarette Use Over Time Among Adolescents. The Journal of Adolescent Health, Jun 24. pii: S1054-139X(19)30199-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2019.04.002. [Epub ahead of print]

56% of Adolescent Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems Users Also Use Other Tobacco Products

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A newly published study examined how adolescents use electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), and compared youth who are only use ENDS and polytobacco users (ENDS and at least one other tobacco product). Researchers surveyed a nationally representative sample of 3,517 13-25-year olds.

Findings included:

·         4.5% of adolescents and 10% of young adults reported past 30-day ENDS use.

·         ENDS users were 38.8% female and 70.6% white.

·         Over half (55.9%) were polytobacco ENDS users.

·         The most common patterns of polytobacco ENDS use were ENDS and cigarettes (11.5%), ENDS and cigars (7.7%), and ENDS, cigars, and waterpipe (5.2%).

·         Those who perceived ENDS to be less harmful than cigarettes were more likely to be exclusive ENDS users than those who perceived ENDS to be as or more harmful than cigarettes.

·         There were no differences between ENDS groups on age, race, sex, parental education, sexual orientation, or ENDS use frequency.

The researchers concluded that the Food and Drug Administration is responsible for communicating product risk to consumers and should consider common patterns of use and relative risk perceptions in its ENDS public education efforts.

Source: King et al. (2018). Polytobacco Use Among a Nationally Representative Sample of Adolescent and Young Adult E-Cigarette Users. The Journal of Adolescent Health, Aug 13. pii: S1054-139X(18)30186-1. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2018.04.010. [Epub ahead of print]

Did You Know? Sexual Minority Youth at Greater Risk of Alcohol, Tobacco and Marijuana Use

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A recently published study examined substance use disparities among sexual minority youth. The current subsample of 348,175 students participated in the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) study from years 2005 to 2015.

 

Findings included:

·         Female lesbian and bisexual youth were at risk of initiating substance use at younger ages and, among lifetime users, were more likely to persist in their tobacco and marijuana use over time, relative to sexually active female heterosexual youth.

·         Among lifetime users, male youth with partners of both sexes were at greater risk of persistent use of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana over time and earlier ages of first use.

 

Source: Talley et al. (2019). Sexual Minority Youth at Risk of Early and Persistent Alcohol, Tobacco, and Marijuana Use. Archives of Sexual Behavior, Jan 2. doi: 10.1007/s10508-018-1275-7. [Epub ahead of print]

 

Missed the JUUL Hearings? Watch the Videos Below! Plus, LOOP Leaders Attended the Hearings

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JUUL Called Before Congressional Subcommittee

On July 24 and 25, 2019, the Subcommittee on Economic and Consumer Policy, led by Chairman Raja Krishnamoorthi, held hearings to examine JUUL Labs, Inc.’s responsibility for the youth nicotine addiction epidemic.

 

Watch Part I and II of the hearings below:

Part I of the Congressional Hearings

 

Part II of the Congressional Hearings

 

Our LOOP Leaders Attended these Hearings!

Check out our very own Dr. Valerie Yerger and Carol McGruder who were present at the hearings. In fact, they were sitting in the very front row behind the JUUL co-founder. They were featured in the New York Times article photo (below).

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MEET JACK WAXMAN

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MEET JACK WAXMAN

Jack Waxman is a sophomore at Cornell University. He is the creator of Juulers Against Juul, and has appeared on Good Morning America, Good Day NY, BBC, and NPR. He worked for Senator Chuck Schumer on issues related to public health. He is currently an Ambassador for Truth Initiative, the leading tobacco control organization.

 

CHECK OUT WHAT HE IS DOING FOR THE COMMUNITY IN HIS VIDEO

Flavored Tobacco Use Linked to Multiple Tobacco Product Use among Adolescents

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A recently published study examined the relationships between flavored tobacco use and single, dual, and poly tobacco product use, among adolescents. Data were obtained from the 2017 National Youth Tobacco Survey. Participants were 2,329 adolescent past 30-day tobacco users.

 

Findings included:

·         Approximately half of all adolescent tobacco users (49%) reported use of more than one product.

·         The majority of adolescent tobacco users reported using flavors (73%).

·         Flavored tobacco use was significantly correlated with a greater risk of dual and poly tobacco use, relative to single product use.

·         Similarly, flavored tobacco use was significantly correlated with a greater risk of poly tobacco use, relative to dual tobacco use.

 

The researchers concluded that there is a positive relationship between flavored tobacco use and multiple tobacco product use. Recommendations included stronger regulations of flavored tobacco products and the need to emphasize flavored tobacco use in prevention and education programs.

 

Source: Mantey et al. (2018). Flavored tobacco use is associated with dual and poly tobacco use among adolescents. Addictive Behaviors, Dec 27;92:84-88. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.12.028. [Epub ahead of print]