Did You Know That Low SES is Linked to More Favorable Attitudes Toward Potential New Tobacco Regulations?

A newly published study examined attitudes toward four potential U.S. Federal tobacco regulations (banning menthol from cigarettes, reducing nicotine levels in cigarettes, banning candy and fruit flavored electronic cigarettes, and banning candy and fruit flavored little cigars and cigarillos) and associations with individual and state variables. A nationally representative phone survey of 4,337 adults assessed attitudes toward potential policies.

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Did You Know That Creating Geographically Uniform Tax Levels Could Reduce Disparities in Cigarette Smoking?

A recently published study (Preventive Medicine, December 2017) examined how cigarette excise tax rates differ for population groups defined by race, ethnicity, poverty status, and sexual orientation, and how these differences have evolved over time.
Findings included:
  • In 2014, the average U.S. resident was required to pay $2.68 in cigarette taxes, more than 60% of which was due to state and local taxation.
  • On average, Asian/Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander populations faced the highest average tax ($2.95), which was $0.44 more than American Indian populations.
  • Local taxes disproportionately augmented state and federal taxes for non-White populations, same-sex couples, and people living in poverty.
  • Geographic variation in cigarette excise taxes produces sociodemographic variation in cigarette tax exposure.

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