Did You Know? California has Reduced Smoking Faster than the Rest of the US

California

Three cigarette smoking behaviors influence lung cancer rates: how many people start, the amount they smoke, and the age they quit. California has reduced smoking faster than the rest of the US and trends in these 3 smoking behaviors should inform lung cancer trends. A newly published study examined trends in smoking behavior (initiation, intensity, and quitting) in California and the rest of US by regression models using the 1974-2014 National Health Interview Surveys (n=962,174).

 

Findings included:

·                     Among those aged 18- 35 years, California had much larger declines than the rest of the US in smoking initiation and intensity, and increased quitting.

·                     In 2012-14, among this age group, only 19% had ever smoked; smokers consumed only 6.3 cigarettes/day; and 46% of ever-smokers had quit by age 35.

·                     Each of these metrics was at least 24% better than in the rest of the US.

·                     There was no marked California effect on quitting or intensity among seniors. From 1986-2013, annual lung cancer mortality decreased more rapidly in California and by 2013 was 28% lower than in the rest of the US.

·                     California’s tobacco control efforts were associated with a major reduction in cigarette smoking among those under age 35 years.

 

The researchers concluded that these changes will further widen the lung cancer gap that already exists between California and the rest of the US.

 

Source: Pierce et al. (2018). Trends in lung cancer and cigarette smoking: California compared to the rest of the United States. Cancer Prevention Research, Oct 10. pii: canprevres.0341.2018. doi: 10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-18-0341. [Epub ahead of print]

Did You Know That Low SES is Linked to More Favorable Attitudes Toward Potential New Tobacco Regulations?

A newly published study examined attitudes toward four potential U.S. Federal tobacco regulations (banning menthol from cigarettes, reducing nicotine levels in cigarettes, banning candy and fruit flavored electronic cigarettes, and banning candy and fruit flavored little cigars and cigarillos) and associations with individual and state variables. A nationally representative phone survey of 4,337 adults assessed attitudes toward potential policies.

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Did You Know That Creating Geographically Uniform Tax Levels Could Reduce Disparities in Cigarette Smoking?

A recently published study (Preventive Medicine, December 2017) examined how cigarette excise tax rates differ for population groups defined by race, ethnicity, poverty status, and sexual orientation, and how these differences have evolved over time.
Findings included:
  • In 2014, the average U.S. resident was required to pay $2.68 in cigarette taxes, more than 60% of which was due to state and local taxation.
  • On average, Asian/Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander populations faced the highest average tax ($2.95), which was $0.44 more than American Indian populations.
  • Local taxes disproportionately augmented state and federal taxes for non-White populations, same-sex couples, and people living in poverty.
  • Geographic variation in cigarette excise taxes produces sociodemographic variation in cigarette tax exposure.

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