Alternative Tobacco Product Use, Ownership of Tobacco Promotional Items, and Easy Access to Cigarettes Linked to Increased Smoking Susceptibility Among Youth

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A newly published study examined perceptions and behaviors associated with smoking susceptibility among adolescents in the current tobacco landscape. Participants were 8th and 10th grade never-smokers of conventional cigarettes from Monitoring the Future surveys (2014-2016).

 

Findings included:

  • Among never-smokers of conventional cigarettes, 17% were susceptible to smoking, 6% were past 30-day alternative tobacco product users, and 4% owned tobacco promotional items.
  • Alternative tobacco product use, ownership of tobacco promotional items, and easy access to cigarettes were associated with increased likelihood of smoking susceptibility.
  • Perceived great influence by antismoking ads and higher perceived addictiveness of conventional cigarette smoking were associated with lower odds of smoking susceptibility.

 

The researchers concluded that alternative tobacco product use, ownership of tobacco promotional items, easy access to cigarettes, low influence by antismoking ads, and low perceptions of the addictiveness of conventional cigarettes are significant and actionable risk factors for smoking susceptibility among adolescents.

Source: Owotomo & Maslowsky (2018). Adolescent Smoking Susceptibility in the Current Tobacco Context: 2014-2016. American Journal of Health Behavior, May 1;42(3):102-113. doi: 10.5993/AJHB.42.3.10.

Joining Forces 2020: Conference Abstracts Now Open!

The California Tobacco Control Program (CTCP)—along with our partners at the Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program (TRDRP) and the Office of Tobacco-Use Prevention Education (TUPE), are excited to launch our Conference Abstract submission site for the Joining Forces 2020 Conference, June 15-18, 2020, in Palm Desert, CA!

The Conference Abstract submission site allows for funded staff and projects of each agency to submit presentations for their work, success stories, research, and more for the 2020 Conference.

Visit our Abstract Site to learn more about the abstract process and read our FAQ, prior to submitting your abstracts!
If you have any questions about submitting an abstract or utilizing the website, please e-mail Lacey.Stockton@csus.edu.

Study Findings Support the Healthy Immigrant Hypothesis

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A study published in February 2019 examined prevalence rates of alcohol, nicotine, and other drug use and major psychiatric disorders (major depressive disorder, persistent depression, bipolar disorder, agoraphobia, social and specific phobias, and antisocial, schizotypal, and borderline personality disorders) between US-born and foreign-born Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites and between early entry versus later-entry foreign-born Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions were analyzed.
Findings included:
  • US-born Mexican Americans and US-born non-Hispanic whites were at greater risk of alcohol, nicotine, and any drug use and their associated disorders and other DSM-5 psychiatric disorders relative to their foreign-born counterparts.
  • Foreign-born Mexican Americans < 18 years old at immigration were at greater risk of drug use, drug use disorders, and nicotine use disorder compared with foreign-born Mexican Americans ≥ 18 years old at immigration.
  • Foreign-born non-Hispanic whites < 18 years old at immigration were more likely to use substances and to develop many psychiatric disorders relative to foreign-born non-Hispanic whites ≥ 18 years old at immigration.
The researchers concluded that the findings of this study support the healthy immigrant hypothesis and adverse role of acculturation for US-born and foreign-born Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites.
Source: Kerridge et al. (2019). Substance Use and Psychiatric Disorders Among Mexican Americans and Non-Hispanic Whites by Immigration Status. The Primary Care Companion for CNS Disorders, 21(1).

Immigrant, Black, and Hispanic Hospital Patients Less Likely To Be Prescribed Nicotine Replacement Therapy

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A recently published study explored the differences in nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) prescribing behavior by patient immigrant status. Data from patient surveys and electronic medical-record reviews were used to examine associations between immigrant status and prescription of NRT in-hospital and on discharge. The study population included 1,608 participants, of whom 21% were not born in the United States.

 

Findings included:

·         Nonimmigrants were more likely than immigrants to be prescribed NRT in the hospital and similarly on discharge.

·         Both groups were equally likely to accept NRT in-hospital when prescribed.

·         Being an immigrant, Black, and Hispanic were associated with lower likelihood of being prescribed NRT in-hospital.

·         Provision of NRT prescription at discharge showed no significant difference between immigrants and nonimmigrants.

 

Source: Chen et al. (2018). Disparities in hospital smoking cessation treatment by immigrant status. Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse, May 4:1-14.

Did You Know? Study Shows that Tobacco 21 Policies are Effective in Reducing Smoking Among 18-20 Year Olds

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States and municipalities are increasingly restricting tobacco sales to those under age-21, in an effort to reduce youth and young adult smoking. A recently published study examined the effectiveness of such policies. Researchers analyzed 2011 – 2016 data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System’s Selected Metropolitan/Micropolitan Area Risk Trends dataset.

 

Findings included:

·         Current smoking rates fell from 16.5 percent in 2011 to 8.9 percent in 2016 among 18-20 year-olds in these data.

·         A tobacco-21 policy covering one’s entire metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas (MMSA) yields an approximately 3.1 percentage point reduction in 18 to 20 year-olds’ likelihoods of smoking.

·         Accounting for partial policy exposure – tobacco-21 laws implemented in some but not all jurisdictions within an MMSA implies that the average exposed 18 to 20 year-old experienced a 1.2 percentage point drop in their likelihood of being a smoker.

 

The researchers concluded that local tobacco-21 policies yield a substantive reduction in smoking among 18 to 20 year-olds living in metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas. This finding provides empirical support for efforts to raise the tobacco purchasing age to 21 as a means to reduce young adult smoking. Moreover, it suggests that state laws preempting local tobacco-21 policies may impede public health.

 

Source: Friedman & Wu (2019). Do Local Tobacco-21 Laws Reduce Smoking among 18 to 20 Year-Olds? Nicotine & Tobacco Research, Jul 26. pii: ntz123. doi: 10.1093/ntr/ntz123. [Epub ahead of print]

LOOP Leaders In the Field Focus On Menthol, Flavors & Vaping

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unnamed (11)Dr. Valerie Yerger in Santa Clara County
Dr. Yerger was invited to present at Hooked: Reverse the Vaping Epidemic 2019 Summit in Santa Clara County on Friday, September 13th hosted by Santa Clara County Public Health Department, Tobacco Use Prevention Education, and First Five Santa Clara County. Her presentation on “Menthol, Flavors, and Vaping: Advocates Working Together to Kick These Poisons Out of Our Communities” focused on the tobacco industry’s influence in communities of color. The summit also included a keynote delivered by April Rosseler, Chief of California Tobacco Control Program with the California Department of Public Health. In addition, there was a Tobacco 101 presentation with Bonnie Helpern-Felsher, a youth experience panel, and a discussion of potential solutions with Superintendent Mary-Ann Dewan, Commissioner Leticia Pelayo, and Former Supervisor Ken Yeager.
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Carol McGruder in Fresno
Carol McGruder, Director of AMPLIFY, along with other members of the California Tobacco Control Program-funded coordinating centers (Rod Lew with the Asian American Pacific Islander Coordinating Center, Rosendo Iniguez with the Hispanic Latino Coordinating Center, Amanda Walner with LGBTQ Coordinating Center, and Wendy Kaplan with American Indian Native American Coordinating Center) held a press conference in Fresno on Tuesday, September 17th addressing the vaping epidemic. This was a timely issue as there was a vaping-related death confirmed in Tulare County.

Would you like one of the LOOP team members or trainers to present on a specific topic in your county or city? Email us at theloop@ucsf.edu.

Using the Internet to Reach Smokers who are Homeless

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The prevalence of cigarette smoking among people experiencing homelessness is 70%. A recently published study examined exposure to tobacco messaging among homeless smokers.  The researchers recruited a sample of adults experiencing homelessness who were current cigarette smokers (i.e. smoked in the past 30 days) from shelters and service sites in San Francisco. The survey explored self-reported use of internet and online streaming services, and exposure to tobacco messaging.

 

Findings included:

  • 75% of respondents reported using the internet and 67% reported using online streaming video in a typical week.
  • Many participants had seen online advertisements for tobacco products (42%) or anti-tobacco industry messages (46%), although participants reported seeing both advertisements and warnings related to tobacco more frequently offline than online.
  • Respondents who reported using the internet for more than 4 h in a typical week were more likely to recall seeing tobacco-related warnings or advertisements online.
  • Respondents who reported seeing tobacco-related warnings and advertisements were more likely to have attempted to quit smoking within the past year.

 

The researchers concluded that these findings suggest an opportunity to use the internet to communicate the harms of tobacco products with messages tailored towards adults experiencing homelessness.

Source: Elser et al. (2019). Exposure to pro- and anti-tobacco messages online and off-line among people experiencing homelessness. Preventive Medicine Report, Jul 3, 15, 100944.

Did You Know? Low Income Linked to E-Cigarette Use

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A recently published study examined associations between sociodemographic factors and e-cigarette use in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) for years 2015-2016 were analyzed to assess e-cigarette use.

 

Findings included:

  • Compared with adults aged ≥55 years, odds of e-cigarette use were 4.77 times higher among ages 18 to 34 years and 2.16 times higher among ages 35 to 54 years.
  • Higher odds of e-cigarette use were observed among widowed/divorced/separated participants compared with those who were married/living with a partner, among participants with less than high school or high school/general educational development (GED) education compared with those with college degrees/some college, and among those with incomes below the poverty level compared with above the poverty level.
  • For non-smokers of conventional cigarettes, higher odds of e-cigarette use were observed among males compared with females, Mexican Americans/Other Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic whites, and non-working participants compared with those who were working.

 

Overall findings indicate that individuals who are widowed/divorced/separated, individuals with lower education, and with incomes below the poverty level are more likely to report ever use of e-cigarettes.

Source: Stallings-Smith & Ballantyne (2019). Ever Use of E-Cigarettes Among Adults in the United States: A Cross-Sectional Study of Sociodemographic Factors. Inquiry, Jan-Dec, 56:46958019864479.

California Rising Conference Art Gallery – Call For Entries!

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Art is a powerful tool for social change.
The California Rising: Empowering Communities to Advance Health Equity conference planning workgroup invites you to submit visual art for display during a Gallery Walk session at the conference. Creative pieces will be curated alongside data-centered poster boards depicting the story of tobacco-related disparities in California. The Gallery Walk will present visual information to reinforce the conference themes of economic inequality, tobacco industry, and traumatization, while also presenting images of action and community resilience.

FAQs

What types of visual art will be accepted?
A broad range of visual art will be considered for the Gallery Walk. Painting, drawing, photography (including Photovoice projects), sculpture, ceramics, crafts, textiles, video or recording, short written work (e.g. poetry), and others are welcome. Artifacts of culture (such as flags, clothing, accessories, and similar items) are also welcome.

The workgroup is particularly interested in pieces that showcase the tobacco industry’s targeted efforts on diverse communities; highlight data that bring tobacco-related disparities to life through visual imagery; and explore how diverse communities interpret their experience with tobacco problems and resiliency, through their unique lens. Consider perspectives that you can relate to through factors such as:

  • Race, ethnicity, culture;
  • Age,
  • Gender,
  • Sexual Orientation,
  • Socioeconomic Status,
  • Military Service Member/ Veteran Status,
  • And many more perspectives.
What are the technical requirements for submissions?
A broad and diverse range of submissions is sought; however, please note the following technical requirements
  • Accommodation cannot be made for: pieces that are greater than 24 inches in any direction (with the exception of folded textiles, for example); any piece weighing more than 25 pounds.
  • If you are submitting a digital image of your work (for example, a photo depicting tobacco’s impact on your community or a photo of your artwork in lieu of displaying the actual piece) you will be asked to provide a high resolution image, which the workgroup may choose to print on poster board for display.
  • You may submit work even if you are not attending the event, but will need to make special arrangements for drop off/pickup, and the California Tobacco Control Program (CTCP) may not be able to accommodate all arrangements. If you would like to submit work but will not be present, a digital image may be the best option.
  • If you include tobacco products of any kind in your work, they must be contained in a way that Gallery Walk participants are not exposed to toxic/unpleasant tobacco odors.
  • You may submit more than one entry.
  • The goal of the Gallery Walk is to provide a space for thoughtful reflection and candid informal discussion on tobacco related health inequities. The workgroup may decline submissions that are not aligned with the theme or intent of the Gallery Walk, or that are not logistically possible to accommodate.

    If you are unsure if your submission meets the technical requirements, or you have any questions before submitting, please contact Kara Gash at kara.gash@cdph.ca.gov.

    When and where will submissions be displayed?
    Your work will be displayed in a breakout room during the conference. The Gallery Walk room will remain locked when not attended by a CTCP staff room monitor. CTCP will be diligent in the care of submitted pieces, but is not responsible for any loss or damage that may occur.

    When is Drop off/ Pickup?
    Accepted pieces can be dropped off with CTCP staff at the registration table the evening prior to the conference or the morning of the conference. For anyone submitting work, but not attending the conference, it is the responsibility of the submitter to make arrangements for pickup/drop off with the CTCP point of contact, Kara Gash.

Have Questions or Need a Submission Form?
Contact Kara Gash at kara.gash@cdph.ca.gov.
Email your completed form and creative piece to Kara Gash.

You will be asked to upload a photo of your work, dimensions, a brief statement about your work tying it to one or more conference themes, and your contact information.

Deadline to submit: October 11, 2019

CTCP RFA “Advancing Momentum for a Tobacco-Free California” is Now Open!

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The California Department of Public Health (CDPH), California Tobacco Control Program (CTCP) has released a Request for Application (RFA) 20-10005 – Advancing Momentum for a Tobacco-Free California.

This Request for Application (RFA) will fund approximately thirty-five (35) progressive projects with three (3) or more years of demonstrated agency and staff experience in tobacco control to advance proven strategies to prevent and reduce tobacco use, strengthen partnerships with priority populations, and increase the reach and impact of tobacco control programs in underserved areas.

 

 

Need help in completing an RFA?

The LOOP has experienced Tailored Assistance Trainers who can support you in this process at NO CHARGE! Email us at TheLOOP@ucsf.edu.

 

View RFA Details Here!